Showing posts with label Henry V. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Henry V. Show all posts

Sunday, October 24, 2021

Henry V - Speech at Agincourt - Eve of Saint Crispin's Day



ON THIS DAY 25 OCTOBER 

 The Battle of Agincourt was one of the greatest English victories in the Hundred Years' War. It took place on 25 October 1415 (Saint Crispin's Day) near Agincourt in northern France. England's unexpected victory against a numerically superior French army boosted English morale and prestige, crippled France, and started a new period of English dominance in the war. The celebrated St Crispin's Day speech is a part of William Shakespeare's play, Henry V, Act IV Scene iii 18–67. An extract follows:

 "This story shall the good man teach his son; And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by, From this day to the ending of the world, But we in it shall be remember├Ęd— We few, we happy few, we band of brothers; For he to-day that sheds his blood with me Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile, This day shall gentle his condition; And gentlemen in England now a-bed Shall think themselves accurs'd they were not here, And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's day.'


Sunday, August 9, 2009

Henry V -- "Non Nobis Domine"






This beautiful rendition of a classic hymn, "Non Nobis Domine." is from the movie, Henry V, with Kevin Branagh. In the above clip, it is offered in thanksgiving for a miraculous victory at the Battle of Agincourt.

The Latin text derives from Psalm 113:9 (according to the Vulgate numbering), which corresponds to Psalm 115:1 in the King James Version. It reads,

Latin English

Non nobis, non nobis, Domine
Sed nomini tuo da gloriam.

Not to us, not to us, o Lord,
But to your name give glory.



Saturday, October 25, 2008

French Accuse the English of War Crimes



On what was historically St. Crispin's Day, 593 years ago today, 150,000 French were defeated by 6,000 English at Agincourt, France. The great battle was commemorated in Shakespeare's immortal history play, Henry V.

But if you can't win a war, you can always revise the history. So nearly 600 years after the battle, revisionist historians from all over France will gather at the historic battlefield for a conference that will:
"suggest that the extent of the feat of arms was massively exaggerated, with claims that the English were hugely outnumbered a lie. More controversially still, they will say that the foreign invaders used numerous underhand tactics against an honourable enemy."
The Telegraph has the story of today's conference of revisionist French historians.

Too bad we'll miss the conference in 2538 that explains France's glorious role in the liberation of Europe from Nazi tyranny.


Wednesday, October 24, 2007

St. Crispin’s Day, Agincourt and Henry V


Until recent decades, October 25 was the feast day of twin brothers born to a noble Roman family in the third century AD. Crispin and Crispinian, patron saints of cobblers, tanners and leather workers, are said to have preached Christianity to the Gauls during the day, and made shoes by night. While removed from the Church’s liturgical calendar, the feast day will always be remembered because of its reference in Shakespeare’s great history play, Henry V.

In that play, the King gives what must be the most rousing and inspirational speech of all time to his exhausted, sick, hungry and diminished “band of brothers,” as they prepared for battle with the French.
Approximately 5000 English and Welsh archers, and 900 men-at-arms, defeated 20,000 to 30,000 French on their own ground at the Battle of Agincourt on October 25, 1415.

In my view, it is hard to imagine it ever being delivered with more skill and power than it was by Kenneth Branagh in the 1989 film for which he was nominated “Best Actor” and “Best Director.”

This speech is a reminder, in these perilous times, that the ability to speak and inspire are important qualities in a national leader.

Following are scenes of Branagh delivering the St. Crispin’s Day Speech just before the great battle, and the scene following the battle with the beautiful hymn of than
ksgiving, “Non Nobis, Domine,” (Not Unto Us, O Lord, Be the Glory).


Speech by King Henry V on the Eve of the Battle of Agincourt

WESTMORELAND. O that we now had here
But
one ten thousand of those men in England
That do no work to-day!
KING. What's he that wishes so?
My cousin Westmoreland? No, my fair cousin;
If we are mark'd to die, we are enow
To do our country loss; and if to live,
The fewer men, the greater share of honour.
God's will! I pray thee, wish not one man more.
By Jove, I am not covetous for gold,
Nor care I who doth feed upon my cost;
It yearns me not if men my garments wear;
Such outward things dwell not in my desires.
But if it be a sin to covet honour,
I am the most offending soul alive.
No, faith, my coz, wish not a man from
England.
God's peace! I would not lose so great an honour
As one man more methinks would share from me
For the best hope I have. O, do not wish one more!
Rather proclaim it, Westmoreland, through my host,
That he which hath no stomach to this fight,
Let him depart; his passport shall be made,
And crowns for convoy put into his purse;
We would not die in that man's company
That fears his fellowship to die with us.
This day is call'd the feast of Crispian.
He that outlives this day, and comes safe home,
Will stand a tip-toe when this day is nam'd,
And rouse him at the name of Crispian.
He that shall live this day, and see old age,
Will yearly on the vigil feast his neighbours,
And say 'To-morrow is Saint Crispian.'
Then will he strip his sleeve and show his scars,
And say 'These wounds I had on Crispian's day.'
Old men forget; yet all shall be forgot,
But he'll remember, with advantages,
What feats he did that day. Then shall our names,
Familiar in his mouth as household words-
Harry the King,
Bedford and Exeter,
Warwick and Talbot, Salisbury and Gloucester-
Be in their flowing cups freshly rememb'red.
This story shall the good man teach his son;
And Crispin Crispian shall ne'er go by,
From this day to the ending of the world,
But we in it shall be remembered --
We few, we happy few, we band of brothers;
For he to-day that sheds his blood with me
Shall be my brother; be he ne'er so vile,
This day shall gentle his condition;
And gentlemen in England now-a-bed
Shall think themselves accurs'd they were not here,
And hold their manhoods cheap whiles any speaks
That fought with us upon Saint Crispin's Day.