Old Rag Mountain, Shenandoah National Park, Virginia

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Sunday, March 1, 2015

Friday, February 27, 2015

Coexist?

Finally, a video response to those deluded idiots riding around with a Coexist bumper sticker on their car.



Sorry, Jeb, the Race Is Wide Open

Democrats may be ready for Hillary, but nothing is inevitable for the GOP.


By Peggy Noonan

Thoughts on the 2016 presidential primaries:

No one expects anything from the Democrats. They will back, accept or acquiesce in a coronation. This will not be called passive but disciplined. But when you think about it—one of our two major parties, in a time of considerable national peril, will settle its presidential nomination without vigorous debate—it is weird and disturbing.

Thursday, February 26, 2015

Right to Work Latest Move in Walker Transformation of Wisconsin

From The Journal Sentinel
By Jason Stein
Hundreds of union members rally outside the Capitol in Madison on Tuesday to oppose a Republican-led measure that would make Wisconsin a right-to-work state.
Reuters/Landov

Madison — With their embrace of right-to-work legislation, Republicans are advancing their four-year transformation of Wisconsin, weaving conservative policies and politics into the fabric of a state where the Progressive era has yielded to the age of Scott Walker.

This Republican revolution arguably represents the greatest reordering of Wisconsin's politics in a century, encompassing everything from allowing the concealed carry of handguns, putting new rules on abortion providers and rolling over once powerful union foes.

World Christianity by the Numbers

By George Weigel

The annual “Status of Global Christianity” survey published by the International Bulletin of Missionary Research is a cornucopia of numbers: some are encouraging; others are discouraging; many of them are important for grasping the nature of this particular moment in Christian history.

This year’s survey works from a baseline of 1900 A.D., and makes projections out to 2050. Within that century and a half there’s some good news about the global human condition that ought to be kept in mind when remembering the bad news of the 20th century and the early 21st. For example: in 1900, 27.6 percent of adults in a world population of 1.6 billion were literate. In 2015, 81 percent of the adults in a global population of 7.3 billion are literate, and the projection is that, by 2050, 88 percent of the adults in a world of 9.5 billion people will be literate—a remarkable accomplishment.