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Thursday, November 13, 2008

Anti-Prop. 8 Activists Aim Racial Slurs at California African-Americans - Both Homosexual and Straight

Blacks Voted for Proposition 8 70% to 30%, According to Exit Polls

From LifeSiteNews.com

Amid the rampant homosexualist protests in California, following the victory of Proposition 8, reports are pouring into homosexual blogs of same-sex "marriage" supporters directing their bile against the African-American community, aiming racist and threatening remarks even against blacks who are themselves homosexual.

Exit polls showed that African-Americans supported Proposition 8, the true marriage ballot measure, 70% to 30%.

One reader of Rod 2.0, a leading gay blog by an African-American, reported that when he joined the large homosexual protest outside Westwood's Mormon Temple, protesters called him a "nigger" at least twice.

"It was like being at a klan rally except the klansmen were wearing Abercrombie polos and Birkenstocks," wrote the commenter.

"YOU NIGGER, one man shouted at men (sic). If your people want to call me a FAGGOT, I will call you a nigger. Someone else said same thing to me on the next block near the temple ... me and my friend were walking, he is also gay but Korean, and a young WeHo clone said after last night the niggers better not come to West Hollywood if they knew what was BEST for them."

Another African-American reader from Los Angeles reports that he and his boyfriend, also black, were harassed about their race despite their prominently carrying "No on 8" signs.

"Three older men accosted my friend and shouted, 'Black people did this, I hope you people are happy!'" he relates.

When the man pointed out the sign he carried, "One of the older men said it didn't matter because 'most black people hated gays' and he was 'wrong' to think we had compassion,'" he says. "I guess he never thought we were gay."

Jasmyne Cannick, another popular African-American homosexual blogger, said last week that within three days of Proposition 8's victory she received several calls from homosexual and straight blacks who described being called “niggers” and "being accosted in their cars and told that it was because of 'you people gays don’t have equal rights and you better watch your back.'"

Homosexualist leaders have called upon their constituents to cease the racist attacks.

Kathryn Kolbert, President of the liberal People For the American Way Foundation, said that homosexuals should not blame blacks, saying that "responding to that hurt by lashing out at African Americans is deeply wrong and offensive — not to mention destructive to the goal of advancing equality."

Instead, she suggested that the cultural influence of religion is more to blame. She claims that religious leaders swayed the black community against same-sex "marriage," and convinced them to break away from the "civil rights" banner now hoisted by homosexuals.

In response, Dr. Alveda King, niece of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., told LifeSiteNews.com that "it is absolutely no secret that African Americans support the sanctity of life and marriage," adding that this fact is "something that America needs to know."

Blacks support the true definition of marriage rather than "equal rights" for homosexual unions, King said, because homosexual "marriage" is not a legitimate civil rights issue - contrary to some who say blacks have hypocritically abandoned the fight for equal protection under law.

"Certainly and obviously procreative marriage - between one man and woman - is God's best plan for raising children," said King. "We as African Americans cannot possibly be missing the boat by understanding that the sanctity of marriage is the best way to be sure that the human race thrives."

Anti-marriage protesters have also attracted media attention for targeting individual supporters of Proposition 8.

Scott Eckern of the California Musical Theatre, a true marriage supporter, resigned from his position as artistic director when homosexual "marriage" advocates began attacking Eckern and boycotting the theater. Eckhern had privately donated $1000 to the "Yes on 8" campaign.

Blogger Clyde Fitch launched one of many invectives against Eckern, calling him "an enemy of all that is good in America.

"You deserve not only to be fired, you should be viciously attacked using words and nothing but words by the men and women of the American theatre. And then you should go back to whatever rock you crawled out from under. Slime."

Upon his resignation, Eckern apologized for the "hurt feelings" his actions caused, but did not apologize for his commitment to true marriage.

The Bee also reports that Scott Purves, of Purves & Associates, a Davis insurance company, described someone picketing his business earlier this week with a sign reading, "Purves Family Supports Homophobia."

"If this had gone the other way, I can't imagine the backlash if people protested and called the other side names," said Purves. "People would be angry and rightfully so."


2 comments:

Anonymous said...

Black America and the N-word:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dP2U0jmZjec

Mattheus Mei said...

That's interesting because Coretta Scott King was an advocate for gay rights, from Wiki:

On April 1, 1998 at The Palmer House Hilton in Chicago, King called on the civil rights community to join in the struggle against homophobia and anti-gay bias. "Homophobia is like racism and anti-Semitism and other forms of bigotry in that it seeks to dehumanize a large group of people, to deny their humanity, their dignity and personhood", King stated. "This sets the stage for further repression and violence that spread all too easily to victimize the next minority group."

In a speech in November 2003 at the opening session of the 13th annual Creating Change Conference, organized by the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force, King made her now famous appeal linking the Civil Rights Movement to the LGBT agenda: "I still hear people say that I should not be talking about the rights of lesbian and gay people. ... But I hasten to remind them that Martin Luther King Jr. said, 'Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.' I appeal to everyone who believes in Martin Luther King Jr.’s dream, to make room at the table of brotherhood and sisterhood for lesbian and gay people."

King's support of LGBT rights was strongly criticized by some black pastors. She called her critics "misinformed" and said that Martin Luther King's message to the world was one of equality and inclusion.

In 2003, she invited the National Gay and Lesbian Task Force to take part in observances of the 40th anniversary of the March on Washington and Martin Luther King's "I Have A Dream" speech. It was the first time that an LGBT rights group had been invited to a major event of the African American community.

On March 23, 2004, she told an audience at Richard Stockton University in Pomona, N.J, that same-sex marriage is a civil rights issue. King denounced a proposed amendment advanced by President George W. Bush to the United States Constitution that would ban equal marriage rights for same-sex couples. In her speech King also criticized a group of black pastors in her home state of Georgia for backing a bill to amend that state's constitution to block gay and lesbian couples from marrying. King is quoted as saying "Gay and lesbian people have families, and their families should have legal protection, whether by marriage or civil union. A constitutional amendment banning same-sex marriages is a form of gay bashing and it would do nothing at all to protect traditional marriage."